Tag Archives: sleep issues

Sleep Restriction Results In Weight Gain Despite Decreases In Appetite And Consumption

According to a research abstract presented on June 8 at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, in the presence of free access to food, sleep restricted subjects reported decrease in appetite, food cravings and food consumption; however, they gained weight over the course of the study. Thus, the finding suggests that energy intake exceeded energy expenditure during the sleep restriction

Results indicate that people whose sleep was restricted experienced an average weight gain of 1.31 kilograms over the 11 days of the study. Of the subjects with restricted sleep who reported a change in their appetite and food consumption, more than 70 percent said that it decreased by day 5 of the study. A group of well rested control subjects did not experience the weight gain.

According to lead investigator Siobhan Banks, PhD, a research fellow at the University of South Australia and former assistant research professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, it was surprising that participants did not crave foods rich in carbohydrates after sleep restriction, as previous research suggested they might. Results indicate that even though physiologically the desire to eat was not increased by sleep loss in participants, other factors such as the sedentary environment of the laboratory and the ability to snack for longer due to reduction in time spent asleep might have influenced the weight gain.

“During real-world periods of sleep restriction (say during shift work), people should plan their calorie intake over the time they will be awake, eating small, healthy meals,” said Banks. “Additionally, healthy low fat/sugar snacks should be available so the temptation to eat comfort foods is reduced. Finally, keeping up regular exercise is just as important as what food you eat, so even though people may feel tried, exercising will help regulate energy intake balance.”

The study involved 92 healthy individuals (52 male) between the ages of 22 and 45 years who participated in laboratory controlled sleep restriction. Subjects underwent two nights of baseline sleep (10 hours in bed per night), five nights of sleep restriction and varying recovery for four nights. Nine well rested participants served as controls. Food consumption was ad libitum (subjects had three regular meals per day and access to healthy snacks, and during nights of sleep restriction subjects were given a small sandwich at one a.m.).

Abstract Title: Sustained Sleep Restriction in Healthy Adults with Ad libitum Access to Food Results in Weight Gain without Increased Appetite or Food Cravings
Presentation Date: Monday, June 8
Category: Sleep Deprivation
Abstract ID: 0385

Source:
Kelly Wagner
American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Online cognitive behavioral therapy is effective in treating chronic insomnia

Westchester, Ill. — A study in the June 1 issue of the journal SLEEP demonstrates that online cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for chronic insomnia significantly improves insomnia severity, daytime fatigue, and sleep quality. Online treatment also reduces erroneous beliefs about sleep and pre-sleep mental arousal.

Results indicate that 81 percent of treated participants (30 of 37) reported at least mild improvement in their sleep after completing the five-week program, including 35 percent (13 of 37) who rated themselves as much or very much improved. Thirty percent of treatment group completers were receiving an additional hour of sleep at the end of the program. Those who received treatment also developed healthier attitudes about sleep and were less likely to report having an overactive mind at bedtime.

According to principal investigator Norah Vincent, PhD, psychologist at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada, the researchers were surprised by the significant results in the absence of any ongoing support from a clinician. The treatment program consisted of psychoeducation about insomnia, information concerning sleep hygiene, stimulus control instruction, relaxation training, sleep restriction and cognitive therapy.

“Although each segment of the CBT program is important, the cognitive therapy module was the most positively rated,” said Vincent. “The cognitive therapy section was designed to help individuals to develop realistic expectations about sleep and the impact of sleep on next-day functioning while teaching a variety of strategies for coping with an overactive mind and worries.”

The study involved118 adults with chronic insomnia who were referred to a teaching hospital behavioral medicine sleep clinic or who had responded to a newspaper advertisement. Those included in the study were required to have high-speed Internet access and a home computer, as well as an insomnia complaint with daytime impairment occurring more than four nights a week for six months or longer.

Participants were randomly assigned to a treatment or wait-list group; those on the wait list were informed that they would receive access to treatment once their follow-up data was received, and they were asked to refrain from treatment-seeking during the course of the study. Individuals receiving treatment engaged in online CBT from home for five weeks with no clinician interaction. The online treatment used audiovisual clips as the main teaching component, downloadable mp3 files for relaxation training and PDF files for psychoeducation and cognitive therapy. Findings were based on self-reported data gathered from a post-treatment questionnaire packet and sleep diaries.


There was a 33-percent drop-out rate, and physician-referred participants were significantly more likely to drop out than community-recruited participants. According to the authors, the rate of attrition for North American in-person psychotherapy is 22 percent.

Vincent said that most individuals could potentially benefit from online CBT for chronic insomnia, as the program has been used successfully by people ranging in age from 18 to 80 years. The researchers speculate that the program also could help teenagers.

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A media fact sheet about insomnia is available at http://aasmnet.org/Resources/FactSheets/Insomnia.pdf, and information for the public is available at http://www.sleepeducation.com/Disorder.aspx?id=6.

SLEEP is the official journal of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC (APSS), a joint venture of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society. The APSS publishes original findings in areas pertaining to sleep and circadian rhythms. SLEEP, a peer-reviewed scientific and medical journal, publishes 12 regular issues and 1 issue comprised of the abstracts presented at the SLEEP Meeting of the APSS.

For a copy of the study, “Logging on for Better Sleep: RCT of the Effectiveness of Online Treatment for Insomnia,” or to arrange an interview with the study’s author, please contact Kelly Wagner, AASM public relations coordinator, at (708) 492-0930, ext. 9331, or kwagner@aasmnet.org.

AASM is a professional membership organization dedicated to the advancement of sleep medicine and sleep-related research. As the national accrediting body for sleep disorders centers and laboratories for sleep related breathing disorders, the AASM promotes the highest standards of patient care. The organization serves its members and advances the field of sleep health care by setting the clinical standards for the field of sleep medicine, advocating for recognition, diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders, educating professionals dedicated to providing optimal sleep health care and fostering the development and application of scientific knowledge.

Reasons Why Sleep Is Important

by Mary Ann Porsuelo

It is widely supported that sleep is vital in leading a healthy lifestyle. Many people still sleep less than the recommended number of hours, though. It may not seem that much to those who cut off their sleeping time for their personal endeavors, but sleep is something that you can ignore. Continue reading

Restless Leg Syndrome Practical Solutions

by Mary Ann Porsuelo

Restless Leg Syndrome, or RLS, has no definite cure as the specific cause of the condition has not yet been discovered. You can get consultations and medical evaluations, but presently there is still no absolute cure. A lot of research was placed into finding out the true cause or Restless Leg Syndrome, and there have been many that has been taken into consideration. Nothing is still final; Restless Leg Syndrome is still a question mark on the sleeping disorders list. Continue reading